Question  1

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Why is the disposal of radioactive waste such a contentious issue in modern society?

Select one:

a. Many people like the idea of such waste being gathered in bulk somewhere for safe keeping, so long as it is not near them.

b. Radioactive waste is often corrosive and there are risks it could contaminate the soil and groundwater near any disposal site.

c. People have concern about health hazards for high concentrations of a material that remains dangerous for a very long time.

d. All of the above 

Question  2

Incorrect

0.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Plutonium-240 is a by-product of a plutonium reactor which has a half-life of 6400 years and is seen as an unwanted contaminant unsuited to making into a bomb. Plutonium-239, on the other hand, is highly desired for bomb making and has a much longer half-life of 24,000 years. Why does this make the choice of radioactive waste disposal into a national security issue?

Select one:

a. Placement of such a highly dangerous material near an ally would be seen as an act of aggression.

b. Such a very long half-life means the location of any disposal site would be unusable for anytime in the near future and thus wasted territory.

c. Over a long enough period of time a waste disposal site will become effectively an easy access mine for weapons-grade plutonium

d. Plutonium could be stolen and used to contaminate urban drinking water and food supplies. 

Question  3

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

While most nuclear weapons are in the hands of the original five “Nuclear Weapons States” smaller nations such as North Korea, Israel, and Pakistan have since developed nuclear weapons. In what way has the existence of nuclear weapons changed the nature of international relations as a result?

Select one:

a. Small nations with nuclear weapon capabilities are seen as disproportionally threatening based upon their capability for mass destruction. 

b. More money spent on weaponry means less money spent on infrastructure, education or healthcare.

c. The establishment of the so-called Group of Eight Industrialized Nations

d. Nuclear powers are permanent members of the United Nations Security Council based on their ability to wage war on an unprecedented scale.

Question  4

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Which of the following is a viable clean and renewable alternative to the use of nuclear power to generate electricity?

Select one:

a. Natural gas

b. Hydroelectric dams 

c. Oil sands

d. Hydraulic fracturing or “fracking”

Question  5

Incorrect

0.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

How did the existence of atomic weapons affect the technological development of nations that lacked atomic weaponry?

Select one:

a. Those nations without atomic weapons avoided any further conflict.

b. Nations without atomic weapons felt a pressing need to develop them or risk annihilation by the atomic powers and devoted substantial resources to this goal.

c. Non-atomic nation states could only be in conflict with other non atomic states or risk a one-sided very dangerous conflict.

d. Nations without atomic weapons were easily controlled by the nations with atomic weapons and had their technological advancements curtailed. 

Question  6

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

The Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962 has been said to be the closest the United States and the Soviet Union came to escalating into a full war. What made this event particularly scary for people watching it unfold on television?

Select one:

a. Society was very tired of conflict following World War II and did not want to see any further bloodshed.

b. The advent of nuclear weapons meant that any conflict could escalate into the death of millions within a matter of a couple days. 

c. The recent advent of color television made the conflict seem more real and less abstract.

d. Cuba had been a vacation spot for many Americans and the prospect of Communism coming this close to American shores implied much greater cultural risk.

Question  7

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

The 1954 film  Godzilla is often seen as a metaphor for nuclear weapons. What can this original film tell us about Japanese society in the 1950s?

Select one:

a. Following World War II Japan had fully recovered its industrial capability.

b. Japan felt vulnerable to attack as they were no longer allowed to possess a standing military

c. Many in Japan felt that nuclear weapons were monstrous and a near mindless force of destruction. 

d. Nuclear weapons, in the right hands, can be useful in defeating more deadly enemies.

Question  8

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Food irradiation is viewed by many as a useful application for its ability to kill harmful bacteria and other organisms.

Select one:

True 

False

Question  9

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

At the time of the tsunami of March 2011 Japan generated approximately 30% of its electricity from nuclear reactors and had plans to expand that percentage to 40% in the near future. On May 5,2012 the last of Japan’s 50 nuclear reactors went offline and Japan was completely without nuclear power for the first time in 40 years. Compare the attitude towards nuclear power in Japan before and after 2011.

Select one:

a. Nuclear power was seen as a necessary evil and was only reluctantly used in Japan before 2011.

b. Nuclear power is seen as a symbol of national pride for Japan which has not been shaken by the Fukushima event.

c. While confidence was eroded by the Fukushima disaster, the Japanese nuclear industry is recovering rapidly.

d. Before the tsunami nuclear power was embraced as a means to energy independence but afterward is seen as too risky. 

Question  10

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

The American nuclear program to build the first atomic bomb cost over $24 billion dollars. Why was this high price justified following the war?

Select one:

a. There was no justification; the price was too high.

b. The money spent on the program was already going to be spent on the Department of Energy; the nuclear program just redirected it.

c. The money needed to be spent to ensure the securing and stockpiling of global supplies of uranium to keep America and its allies safe.

d. Much of the cost went into infrastructure to produce nuclear fuel and thus was of ongoing benefit for further nuclear technology development and research. 

Question  11

Incorrect

0.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

The Cold War was predicated on the notion of brinksmanship. In this context how did the existence of atomic weapons keep the peace?

Select one:

a. Proxy wars could be fought between countries or societies supported by either side without direct conflict between them 

b. Any aggression by either side would result in the destruction of both, a deterrent referred to as mutually assured destruction.

c. Intelligence and espionage prevented either side from having any significant technological advantage over the other.

d. The arms race to manufacture more and more complex weapons kept the economies of both sides flourishing.

Question  12

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Atomic weapons in the United States were developed in 1945. In what year was the first nuclear power plant operational?

Select one:

a. 1941

b. 1943

c. 1951 

d. 1963

Question  13

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

What makes fission power generation especially attractive for sea vessels such as aircraft carriers or submarines?

Select one:

a. There is less risk to human life if a nuclear accident takes place in the middle of the ocean.

b. The heavy water used in a fission reactor can be gathered by the vessels from the ocean floor.

c. The energy density of nuclear fuel means lots of power can be generated without taking up much space for fuel. 

d. Nuclear waste can be easily disposed of while in international waters.

Question  14

Incorrect

0.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

The purpose of the first pillar of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, that of non-proliferation, was intended to:

Select one:

a. Reduce the number of current nuclear weapons stockpiled by the treaty’s signatories

b. Prevent the number of nations that possess nuclear weapons from further increasing

c. Establish peaceful uses of nuclear technology. 

d. Keep the number of nuclear weapons at a fixed ratio between the nuclear powers in 1968

Question  15

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

The Limited Test Ban Treaty of 1963 prohibited all test detonations of nuclear weapons above ground, in space, or underwater. Why was this treaty established?

Select one:

a. To reduce the number of nuclear weapons being built for testing purposes.

b. To prevent nuclear weapons from being developed by countries that did not already have them.

c. To focus attention on peaceful development of atomic energy

d. To stop the effects of nuclear fallout from contaminating the planet’s atmosphere 

Question  16

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Shoe fitting fluoroscopes, which showed live X-ray images of a customer’s foot inside a shoewere purported to demonstrate exemplary shoe fitting and were sold in the United States and other countries starting in the 1920s. Their use dropped off precipitously in the second half of the 20 th  century and none were in use by the mid-1970s. What can we infer from this about public views of radiation and atomic science?

Select one:

a. From the onset the general public feared and distrusted atomic science and its applications.

b. While initially quite skeptical of atomic science, the public grew to accept its use.

c. Atomic science was initially seen as exciting and harmless but perceptions later changed 

d. Use of atomic science by the general public has been positively from the 1920s until today.

Question  17

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

What was the name of the program that researched and built the first atomic weapons in the United States?

Select one:

a. Operation Alsos

b. Los Alamos National Laboratory

c. Tube Alloys

d. Manhattan Project 

Question  18

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Radiogenic isotopes used to image different parts of the body are seen as very dangerous and highly experimental uses of nuclear radiation in medicine.

Select one:

True

False 

Question  19

Incorrect

0.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Albert Einstein was a strong proponent for the development of nuclear weapons before and after World War II.

Select one:

True 

False

Question  20

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

What was the second country to successfully develop nuclear weapons capability following the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945?

Select one:

a. Japan

b. Soviet Union 

c. United Kingdom

d. China

Bottom of Form

Bottom of Form

 

 

Question  1

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Why is the disposal of radioactive waste such a contentious issue in modern society?

Select one:

a. Many people like the idea of such waste being gathered in bulk somewhere for safe keeping, so long as it is not near them.

b. Radioactive waste is often corrosive and there are risks it could contaminate the soil and groundwater near any disposal site.

c. People have concern about health hazards for high concentrations of a material that remains dangerous for a very long time.

d. All of the above 

Question  2

Incorrect

0.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Plutonium-240 is a by-product of a plutonium reactor which has a half-life of 6400 years and is seen as an unwanted contaminant unsuited to making into a bomb. Plutonium-239, on the other hand, is highly desired for bomb making and has a much longer half-life of 24,000 years. Why does this make the choice of radioactive waste disposal into a national security issue?

Select one:

a. Placement of such a highly dangerous material near an ally would be seen as an act of aggression.

b. Such a very long half-life means the location of any disposal site would be unusable for anytime in the near future and thus wasted territory.

c. Over a long enough period of time a waste disposal site will become effectively an easy access mine for weapons-grade plutonium

d. Plutonium could be stolen and used to contaminate urban drinking water and food supplies. 

Question  3

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

While most nuclear weapons are in the hands of the original five “Nuclear Weapons States” smaller nations such as North Korea, Israel, and Pakistan have since developed nuclear weapons. In what way has the existence of nuclear weapons changed the nature of international relations as a result?

Select one:

a. Small nations with nuclear weapon capabilities are seen as disproportionally threatening based upon their capability for mass destruction. 

b. More money spent on weaponry means less money spent on infrastructure, education or healthcare.

c. The establishment of the so-called Group of Eight Industrialized Nations

d. Nuclear powers are permanent members of the United Nations Security Council based on their ability to wage war on an unprecedented scale.

Question  4

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Which of the following is a viable clean and renewable alternative to the use of nuclear power to generate electricity?

Select one:

a. Natural gas

b. Hydroelectric dams 

c. Oil sands

d. Hydraulic fracturing or “fracking”

Question  5

Incorrect

0.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

How did the existence of atomic weapons affect the technological development of nations that lacked atomic weaponry?

Select one:

a. Those nations without atomic weapons avoided any further conflict.

b. Nations without atomic weapons felt a pressing need to develop them or risk annihilation by the atomic powers and devoted substantial resources to this goal.

c. Non-atomic nation states could only be in conflict with other non atomic states or risk a one-sided very dangerous conflict.

d. Nations without atomic weapons were easily controlled by the nations with atomic weapons and had their technological advancements curtailed. 

Question  6

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

The Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962 has been said to be the closest the United States and the Soviet Union came to escalating into a full war. What made this event particularly scary for people watching it unfold on television?

Select one:

a. Society was very tired of conflict following World War II and did not want to see any further bloodshed.

b. The advent of nuclear weapons meant that any conflict could escalate into the death of millions within a matter of a couple days. 

c. The recent advent of color television made the conflict seem more real and less abstract.

d. Cuba had been a vacation spot for many Americans and the prospect of Communism coming this close to American shores implied much greater cultural risk.

Question  7

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

The 1954 film  Godzilla is often seen as a metaphor for nuclear weapons. What can this original film tell us about Japanese society in the 1950s?

Select one:

a. Following World War II Japan had fully recovered its industrial capability.

b. Japan felt vulnerable to attack as they were no longer allowed to possess a standing military

c. Many in Japan felt that nuclear weapons were monstrous and a near mindless force of destruction. 

d. Nuclear weapons, in the right hands, can be useful in defeating more deadly enemies.

Question  8

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Food irradiation is viewed by many as a useful application for its ability to kill harmful bacteria and other organisms.

Select one:

True 

False

Question  9

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

At the time of the tsunami of March 2011 Japan generated approximately 30% of its electricity from nuclear reactors and had plans to expand that percentage to 40% in the near future. On May 5,2012 the last of Japan’s 50 nuclear reactors went offline and Japan was completely without nuclear power for the first time in 40 years. Compare the attitude towards nuclear power in Japan before and after 2011.

Select one:

a. Nuclear power was seen as a necessary evil and was only reluctantly used in Japan before 2011.

b. Nuclear power is seen as a symbol of national pride for Japan which has not been shaken by the Fukushima event.

c. While confidence was eroded by the Fukushima disaster, the Japanese nuclear industry is recovering rapidly.

d. Before the tsunami nuclear power was embraced as a means to energy independence but afterward is seen as too risky. 

Question  10

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

The American nuclear program to build the first atomic bomb cost over $24 billion dollars. Why was this high price justified following the war?

Select one:

a. There was no justification; the price was too high.

b. The money spent on the program was already going to be spent on the Department of Energy; the nuclear program just redirected it.

c. The money needed to be spent to ensure the securing and stockpiling of global supplies of uranium to keep America and its allies safe.

d. Much of the cost went into infrastructure to produce nuclear fuel and thus was of ongoing benefit for further nuclear technology development and research. 

Question  11

Incorrect

0.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

The Cold War was predicated on the notion of brinksmanship. In this context how did the existence of atomic weapons keep the peace?

Select one:

a. Proxy wars could be fought between countries or societies supported by either side without direct conflict between them 

b. Any aggression by either side would result in the destruction of both, a deterrent referred to as mutually assured destruction.

c. Intelligence and espionage prevented either side from having any significant technological advantage over the other.

d. The arms race to manufacture more and more complex weapons kept the economies of both sides flourishing.

Question  12

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Atomic weapons in the United States were developed in 1945. In what year was the first nuclear power plant operational?

Select one:

a. 1941

b. 1943

c. 1951 

d. 1963

Question  13

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

What makes fission power generation especially attractive for sea vessels such as aircraft carriers or submarines?

Select one:

a. There is less risk to human life if a nuclear accident takes place in the middle of the ocean.

b. The heavy water used in a fission reactor can be gathered by the vessels from the ocean floor.

c. The energy density of nuclear fuel means lots of power can be generated without taking up much space for fuel. 

d. Nuclear waste can be easily disposed of while in international waters.

Question  14

Incorrect

0.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

The purpose of the first pillar of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, that of non-proliferation, was intended to:

Select one:

a. Reduce the number of current nuclear weapons stockpiled by the treaty’s signatories

b. Prevent the number of nations that possess nuclear weapons from further increasing

c. Establish peaceful uses of nuclear technology. 

d. Keep the number of nuclear weapons at a fixed ratio between the nuclear powers in 1968

Question  15

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

The Limited Test Ban Treaty of 1963 prohibited all test detonations of nuclear weapons above ground, in space, or underwater. Why was this treaty established?

Select one:

a. To reduce the number of nuclear weapons being built for testing purposes.

b. To prevent nuclear weapons from being developed by countries that did not already have them.

c. To focus attention on peaceful development of atomic energy

d. To stop the effects of nuclear fallout from contaminating the planet’s atmosphere 

Question  16

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Shoe fitting fluoroscopes, which showed live X-ray images of a customer’s foot inside a shoewere purported to demonstrate exemplary shoe fitting and were sold in the United States and other countries starting in the 1920s. Their use dropped off precipitously in the second half of the 20 th  century and none were in use by the mid-1970s. What can we infer from this about public views of radiation and atomic science?

Select one:

a. From the onset the general public feared and distrusted atomic science and its applications.

b. While initially quite skeptical of atomic science, the public grew to accept its use.

c. Atomic science was initially seen as exciting and harmless but perceptions later changed 

d. Use of atomic science by the general public has been positively from the 1920s until today.

Question  17

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

What was the name of the program that researched and built the first atomic weapons in the United States?

Select one:

a. Operation Alsos

b. Los Alamos National Laboratory

c. Tube Alloys

d. Manhattan Project 

Question  18

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Radiogenic isotopes used to image different parts of the body are seen as very dangerous and highly experimental uses of nuclear radiation in medicine.

Select one:

True

False 

Question  19

Incorrect

0.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Albert Einstein was a strong proponent for the development of nuclear weapons before and after World War II.

Select one:

True 

False

Question  20

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

What was the second country to successfully develop nuclear weapons capability following the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945?

Select one:

a. Japan

b. Soviet Union 

c. United Kingdom

d. China

Bottom of Form

Bottom of Form

 

 

Question  1

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Why is the disposal of radioactive waste such a contentious issue in modern society?

Select one:

a. Many people like the idea of such waste being gathered in bulk somewhere for safe keeping, so long as it is not near them.

b. Radioactive waste is often corrosive and there are risks it could contaminate the soil and groundwater near any disposal site.

c. People have concern about health hazards for high concentrations of a material that remains dangerous for a very long time.

d. All of the above 

Question  2

Incorrect

0.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Plutonium-240 is a by-product of a plutonium reactor which has a half-life of 6400 years and is seen as an unwanted contaminant unsuited to making into a bomb. Plutonium-239, on the other hand, is highly desired for bomb making and has a much longer half-life of 24,000 years. Why does this make the choice of radioactive waste disposal into a national security issue?

Select one:

a. Placement of such a highly dangerous material near an ally would be seen as an act of aggression.

b. Such a very long half-life means the location of any disposal site would be unusable for anytime in the near future and thus wasted territory.

c. Over a long enough period of time a waste disposal site will become effectively an easy access mine for weapons-grade plutonium

d. Plutonium could be stolen and used to contaminate urban drinking water and food supplies. 

Question  3

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

While most nuclear weapons are in the hands of the original five “Nuclear Weapons States” smaller nations such as North Korea, Israel, and Pakistan have since developed nuclear weapons. In what way has the existence of nuclear weapons changed the nature of international relations as a result?

Select one:

a. Small nations with nuclear weapon capabilities are seen as disproportionally threatening based upon their capability for mass destruction. 

b. More money spent on weaponry means less money spent on infrastructure, education or healthcare.

c. The establishment of the so-called Group of Eight Industrialized Nations

d. Nuclear powers are permanent members of the United Nations Security Council based on their ability to wage war on an unprecedented scale.

Question  4

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Which of the following is a viable clean and renewable alternative to the use of nuclear power to generate electricity?

Select one:

a. Natural gas

b. Hydroelectric dams 

c. Oil sands

d. Hydraulic fracturing or “fracking”

Question  5

Incorrect

0.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

How did the existence of atomic weapons affect the technological development of nations that lacked atomic weaponry?

Select one:

a. Those nations without atomic weapons avoided any further conflict.

b. Nations without atomic weapons felt a pressing need to develop them or risk annihilation by the atomic powers and devoted substantial resources to this goal.

c. Non-atomic nation states could only be in conflict with other non atomic states or risk a one-sided very dangerous conflict.

d. Nations without atomic weapons were easily controlled by the nations with atomic weapons and had their technological advancements curtailed. 

Question  6

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

The Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962 has been said to be the closest the United States and the Soviet Union came to escalating into a full war. What made this event particularly scary for people watching it unfold on television?

Select one:

a. Society was very tired of conflict following World War II and did not want to see any further bloodshed.

b. The advent of nuclear weapons meant that any conflict could escalate into the death of millions within a matter of a couple days. 

c. The recent advent of color television made the conflict seem more real and less abstract.

d. Cuba had been a vacation spot for many Americans and the prospect of Communism coming this close to American shores implied much greater cultural risk.

Question  7

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

The 1954 film  Godzilla is often seen as a metaphor for nuclear weapons. What can this original film tell us about Japanese society in the 1950s?

Select one:

a. Following World War II Japan had fully recovered its industrial capability.

b. Japan felt vulnerable to attack as they were no longer allowed to possess a standing military

c. Many in Japan felt that nuclear weapons were monstrous and a near mindless force of destruction. 

d. Nuclear weapons, in the right hands, can be useful in defeating more deadly enemies.

Question  8

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Food irradiation is viewed by many as a useful application for its ability to kill harmful bacteria and other organisms.

Select one:

True 

False

Question  9

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

At the time of the tsunami of March 2011 Japan generated approximately 30% of its electricity from nuclear reactors and had plans to expand that percentage to 40% in the near future. On May 5,2012 the last of Japan’s 50 nuclear reactors went offline and Japan was completely without nuclear power for the first time in 40 years. Compare the attitude towards nuclear power in Japan before and after 2011.

Select one:

a. Nuclear power was seen as a necessary evil and was only reluctantly used in Japan before 2011.

b. Nuclear power is seen as a symbol of national pride for Japan which has not been shaken by the Fukushima event.

c. While confidence was eroded by the Fukushima disaster, the Japanese nuclear industry is recovering rapidly.

d. Before the tsunami nuclear power was embraced as a means to energy independence but afterward is seen as too risky. 

Question  10

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

The American nuclear program to build the first atomic bomb cost over $24 billion dollars. Why was this high price justified following the war?

Select one:

a. There was no justification; the price was too high.

b. The money spent on the program was already going to be spent on the Department of Energy; the nuclear program just redirected it.

c. The money needed to be spent to ensure the securing and stockpiling of global supplies of uranium to keep America and its allies safe.

d. Much of the cost went into infrastructure to produce nuclear fuel and thus was of ongoing benefit for further nuclear technology development and research. 

Question  11

Incorrect

0.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

The Cold War was predicated on the notion of brinksmanship. In this context how did the existence of atomic weapons keep the peace?

Select one:

a. Proxy wars could be fought between countries or societies supported by either side without direct conflict between them 

b. Any aggression by either side would result in the destruction of both, a deterrent referred to as mutually assured destruction.

c. Intelligence and espionage prevented either side from having any significant technological advantage over the other.

d. The arms race to manufacture more and more complex weapons kept the economies of both sides flourishing.

Question  12

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Atomic weapons in the United States were developed in 1945. In what year was the first nuclear power plant operational?

Select one:

a. 1941

b. 1943

c. 1951 

d. 1963

Question  13

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

What makes fission power generation especially attractive for sea vessels such as aircraft carriers or submarines?

Select one:

a. There is less risk to human life if a nuclear accident takes place in the middle of the ocean.

b. The heavy water used in a fission reactor can be gathered by the vessels from the ocean floor.

c. The energy density of nuclear fuel means lots of power can be generated without taking up much space for fuel. 

d. Nuclear waste can be easily disposed of while in international waters.

Question  14

Incorrect

0.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

The purpose of the first pillar of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, that of non-proliferation, was intended to:

Select one:

a. Reduce the number of current nuclear weapons stockpiled by the treaty’s signatories

b. Prevent the number of nations that possess nuclear weapons from further increasing

c. Establish peaceful uses of nuclear technology. 

d. Keep the number of nuclear weapons at a fixed ratio between the nuclear powers in 1968

Question  15

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

The Limited Test Ban Treaty of 1963 prohibited all test detonations of nuclear weapons above ground, in space, or underwater. Why was this treaty established?

Select one:

a. To reduce the number of nuclear weapons being built for testing purposes.

b. To prevent nuclear weapons from being developed by countries that did not already have them.

c. To focus attention on peaceful development of atomic energy

d. To stop the effects of nuclear fallout from contaminating the planet’s atmosphere 

Question  16

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Shoe fitting fluoroscopes, which showed live X-ray images of a customer’s foot inside a shoewere purported to demonstrate exemplary shoe fitting and were sold in the United States and other countries starting in the 1920s. Their use dropped off precipitously in the second half of the 20 th  century and none were in use by the mid-1970s. What can we infer from this about public views of radiation and atomic science?

Select one:

a. From the onset the general public feared and distrusted atomic science and its applications.

b. While initially quite skeptical of atomic science, the public grew to accept its use.

c. Atomic science was initially seen as exciting and harmless but perceptions later changed 

d. Use of atomic science by the general public has been positively from the 1920s until today.

Question  17

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

What was the name of the program that researched and built the first atomic weapons in the United States?

Select one:

a. Operation Alsos

b. Los Alamos National Laboratory

c. Tube Alloys

d. Manhattan Project 

Question  18

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Radiogenic isotopes used to image different parts of the body are seen as very dangerous and highly experimental uses of nuclear radiation in medicine.

Select one:

True

False 

Question  19

Incorrect

0.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

Albert Einstein was a strong proponent for the development of nuclear weapons before and after World War II.

Select one:

True 

False

Question  20

Correct

1.00 points out of 1.00

Flag question

Question text

What was the second country to successfully develop nuclear weapons capability following the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945?

Select one:

a. Japan

b. Soviet Union 

c. United Kingdom

d. China

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Why is the disposal of radioactive waste such a contentious issue in modern society? Why is the disposal of radioactive waste such a contentious issue in modern society?

Select one: Select one:

a. Many people like the idea of such waste being gathered in bulk somewhere for safe keeping, so long as it is not near them. a. Many people like the idea of such waste being gathered in bulk somewhere for safe keeping, so long as it is not near them.

b. Radioactive waste is often corrosive and there are risks it could contaminate the soil and groundwater near any disposal site. b. Radioactive waste is often corrosive and there are risks it could contaminate the soil and groundwater near any disposal site.

c. People have concern about health hazards for high concentrations of a material that remains dangerous for a very long time. c. People have concern about health hazards for high concentrations of a material that remains dangerous for a very long time.

d. All of the above  d. All of the above 

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Plutonium-240 is a by-product of a plutonium reactor which has a half-life of 6400 years and is seen as an unwanted contaminant unsuited to making into a bomb. Plutonium-239, on the other hand, is highly desired for bomb making and has a much longer half-life of 24,000 years. Why does this make the choice of radioactive waste disposal into a national security issue? Plutonium-240 is a by-product of a plutonium reactor which has a half-life of 6400 years and is seen as an unwanted contaminant unsuited to making into a bomb. Plutonium-239, on the other hand, is highly desired for bomb making and has a much longer half-life of 24,000 years. Why does this make the choice of radioactive waste disposal into a national security issue?

Select one: Select one:

a. Placement of such a highly dangerous material near an ally would be seen as an act of aggression. a. Placement of such a highly dangerous material near an ally would be seen as an act of aggression.

b. Such a very long half-life means the location of any disposal site would be unusable for anytime in the near future and thus wasted territory. b. Such a very long half-life means the location of any disposal site would be unusable for anytime in the near future and thus wasted territory.

c. Over a long enough period of time a waste disposal site will become effectively an easy access mine for weapons-grade plutonium c. Over a long enough period of time a waste disposal site will become effectively an easy access mine for weapons-grade plutonium

d. Plutonium could be stolen and used to contaminate urban drinking water and food supplies.  d. Plutonium could be stolen and used to contaminate urban drinking water and food supplies. 

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While most nuclear weapons are in the hands of the original five “Nuclear Weapons States” smaller nations such as North Korea, Israel, and Pakistan have since developed nuclear weapons. In what way has the existence of nuclear weapons changed the nature of international relations as a result? While most nuclear weapons are in the hands of the original five “Nuclear Weapons States” smaller nations such as North Korea, Israel, and Pakistan have since developed nuclear weapons. In what way has the existence of nuclear weapons changed the nature of international relations as a result?

Select one: Select one:

a. Small nations with nuclear weapon capabilities are seen as disproportionally threatening based upon their capability for mass destruction.  a. Small nations with nuclear weapon capabilities are seen as disproportionally threatening based upon their capability for mass destruction. 

b. More money spent on weaponry means less money spent on infrastructure, education or healthcare. b. More money spent on weaponry means less money spent on infrastructure, education or healthcare.

c. The establishment of the so-called Group of Eight Industrialized Nations c. The establishment of the so-called Group of Eight Industrialized Nations

d. Nuclear powers are permanent members of the United Nations Security Council based on their ability to wage war on an unprecedented scale. d. Nuclear powers are permanent members of the United Nations Security Council based on their ability to wage war on an unprecedented scale.

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Which of the following is a viable clean and renewable alternative to the use of nuclear power to generate electricity? Which of the following is a viable clean and renewable alternative to the use of nuclear power to generate electricity?

Select one: Select one:

a. Natural gas a. Natural gas

b. Hydroelectric dams  b. Hydroelectric dams 

c. Oil sands c. Oil sands

d. Hydraulic fracturing or “fracking” d. Hydraulic fracturing or “fracking”

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How did the existence of atomic weapons affect the technological development of nations that lacked atomic weaponry? How did the existence of atomic weapons affect the technological development of nations that lacked atomic weaponry?

Select one: Select one:

a. Those nations without atomic weapons avoided any further conflict. a. Those nations without atomic weapons avoided any further conflict.

b. Nations without atomic weapons felt a pressing need to develop them or risk annihilation by the atomic powers and devoted substantial resources to this goal. b. Nations without atomic weapons felt a pressing need to develop them or risk annihilation by the atomic powers and devoted substantial resources to this goal.

c. Non-atomic nation states could only be in conflict with other non atomic states or risk a one-sided very dangerous conflict. c. Non-atomic nation states could only be in conflict with other non atomic states or risk a one-sided very dangerous conflict.

d. Nations without atomic weapons were easily controlled by the nations with atomic weapons and had their technological advancements curtailed.  d. Nations without atomic weapons were easily controlled by the nations with atomic weapons and had their technological advancements curtailed. 

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The Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962 has been said to be the closest the United States and the Soviet Union came to escalating into a full war. What made this event particularly scary for people watching it unfold on television? The Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962 has been said to be the closest the United States and the Soviet Union came to escalating into a full war. What made this event particularly scary for people watching it unfold on television?

Select one: Select one:

a. Society was very tired of conflict following World War II and did not want to see any further bloodshed. a. Society was very tired of conflict following World War II and did not want to see any further bloodshed.

b. The advent of nuclear weapons meant that any conflict could escalate into the death of millions within a matter of a couple days.  b. The advent of nuclear weapons meant that any conflict could escalate into the death of millions within a matter of a couple days. 

c. The recent advent of color television made the conflict seem more real and less abstract. c. The recent advent of color television made the conflict seem more real and less abstract.

d. Cuba had been a vacation spot for many Americans and the prospect of Communism coming this close to American shores implied much greater cultural risk. d. Cuba had been a vacation spot for many Americans and the prospect of Communism coming this close to American shores implied much greater cultural risk.

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The 1954 film  Godzilla is often seen as a metaphor for nuclear weapons. What can this original film tell us about Japanese society in the 1950s? The 1954 film  Godzilla is often seen as a metaphor for nuclear weapons. What can this original film tell us about Japanese society in the 1950s? Godzilla 

Select one: Select one:

a. Following World War II Japan had fully recovered its industrial capability. a. Following World War II Japan had fully recovered its industrial capability.

b. Japan felt vulnerable to attack as they were no longer allowed to possess a standing military b. Japan felt vulnerable to attack as they were no longer allowed to possess a standing military

c. Many in Japan felt that nuclear weapons were monstrous and a near mindless force of destruction.  c. Many in Japan felt that nuclear weapons were monstrous and a near mindless force of destruction. 

d. Nuclear weapons, in the right hands, can be useful in defeating more deadly enemies. d. Nuclear weapons, in the right hands, can be useful in defeating more deadly enemies.

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Food irradiation is viewed by many as a useful application for its ability to kill harmful bacteria and other organisms. Food irradiation is viewed by many as a useful application for its ability to kill harmful bacteria and other organisms.

Select one: Select one:

True  True 

False False

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At the time of the tsunami of March 2011 Japan generated approximately 30% of its electricity from nuclear reactors and had plans to expand that percentage to 40% in the near future. On May 5,2012 the last of Japan’s 50 nuclear reactors went offline and Japan was completely without nuclear power for the first time in 40 years. Compare the attitude towards nuclear power in Japan before and after 2011. At the time of the tsunami of March 2011 Japan generated approximately 30% of its electricity from nuclear reactors and had plans to expand that percentage to 40% in the near future. On May 5,2012 the last of Japan’s 50 nuclear reactors went offline and Japan was completely without nuclear power for the first time in 40 years. Compare the attitude towards nuclear power in Japan before and after 2011.

Select one: Select one:

a. Nuclear power was seen as a necessary evil and was only reluctantly used in Japan before 2011. a. Nuclear power was seen as a necessary evil and was only reluctantly used in Japan before 2011.

b. Nuclear power is seen as a symbol of national pride for Japan which has not been shaken by the Fukushima event. b. Nuclear power is seen as a symbol of national pride for Japan which has not been shaken by the Fukushima event.

c. While confidence was eroded by the Fukushima disaster, the Japanese nuclear industry is recovering rapidly. c. While confidence was eroded by the Fukushima disaster, the Japanese nuclear industry is recovering rapidly.

d. Before the tsunami nuclear power was embraced as a means to energy independence but afterward is seen as too risky.  d. Before the tsunami nuclear power was embraced as a means to energy independence but afterward is seen as too risky. 

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The American nuclear program to build the first atomic bomb cost over $24 billion dollars. Why was this high price justified following the war? The American nuclear program to build the first atomic bomb cost over $24 billion dollars. Why was this high price justified following the war?

Select one: Select one:

a. There was no justification; the price was too high. a. There was no justification; the price was too high.

b. The money spent on the program was already going to be spent on the Department of Energy; the nuclear program just redirected it. b. The money spent on the program was already going to be spent on the Department of Energy; the nuclear program just redirected it.

c. The money needed to be spent to ensure the securing and stockpiling of global supplies of uranium to keep America and its allies safe. c. The money needed to be spent to ensure the securing and stockpiling of global supplies of uranium to keep America and its allies safe.

d. Much of the cost went into infrastructure to produce nuclear fuel and thus was of ongoing benefit for further nuclear technology development and research.  d. Much of the cost went into infrastructure to produce nuclear fuel and thus was of ongoing benefit for further nuclear technology development and research. 

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The Cold War was predicated on the notion of brinksmanship. In this context how did the existence of atomic weapons keep the peace? The Cold War was predicated on the notion of brinksmanship. In this context how did the existence of atomic weapons keep the peace?

Select one: Select one:

a. Proxy wars could be fought between countries or societies supported by either side without direct conflict between them  a. Proxy wars could be fought between countries or societies supported by either side without direct conflict between them 

b. Any aggression by either side would result in the destruction of both, a deterrent referred to as mutually assured destruction. b. Any aggression by either side would result in the destruction of both, a deterrent referred to as mutually assured destruction.

c. Intelligence and espionage prevented either side from having any significant technological advantage over the other. c. Intelligence and espionage prevented either side from having any significant technological advantage over the other.

d. The arms race to manufacture more and more complex weapons kept the economies of both sides flourishing. d. The arms race to manufacture more and more complex weapons kept the economies of both sides flourishing.

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Atomic weapons in the United States were developed in 1945. In what year was the first nuclear power plant operational? Atomic weapons in the United States were developed in 1945. In what year was the first nuclear power plant operational?

Select one: Select one:

a. 1941 a. 1941

b. 1943 b. 1943

c. 1951  c. 1951 

d. 1963 d. 1963

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What makes fission power generation especially attractive for sea vessels such as aircraft carriers or submarines? What makes fission power generation especially attractive for sea vessels such as aircraft carriers or submarines?

Select one: Select one:

a. There is less risk to human life if a nuclear accident takes place in the middle of the ocean. a. There is less risk to human life if a nuclear accident takes place in the middle of the ocean.

b. The heavy water used in a fission reactor can be gathered by the vessels from the ocean floor. b. The heavy water used in a fission reactor can be gathered by the vessels from the ocean floor.

c. The energy density of nuclear fuel means lots of power can be generated without taking up much space for fuel.  c. The energy density of nuclear fuel means lots of power can be generated without taking up much space for fuel. 

d. Nuclear waste can be easily disposed of while in international waters. d. Nuclear waste can be easily disposed of while in international waters.

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The purpose of the first pillar of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, that of non-proliferation, was intended to: The purpose of the first pillar of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, that of non-proliferation, was intended to:

Select one: Select one:

a. Reduce the number of current nuclear weapons stockpiled by the treaty’s signatories a. Reduce the number of current nuclear weapons stockpiled by the treaty’s signatories

b. Prevent the number of nations that possess nuclear weapons from further increasing b. Prevent the number of nations that possess nuclear weapons from further increasing

c. Establish peaceful uses of nuclear technology.  c. Establish peaceful uses of nuclear technology. 

d. Keep the number of nuclear weapons at a fixed ratio between the nuclear powers in 1968 d. Keep the number of nuclear weapons at a fixed ratio between the nuclear powers in 1968

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The Limited Test Ban Treaty of 1963 prohibited all test detonations of nuclear weapons above ground, in space, or underwater. Why was this treaty established? The Limited Test Ban Treaty of 1963 prohibited all test detonations of nuclear weapons above ground, in space, or underwater. Why was this treaty established?

Select one: Select one:

a. To reduce the number of nuclear weapons being built for testing purposes. a. To reduce the number of nuclear weapons being built for testing purposes.

b. To prevent nuclear weapons from being developed by countries that did not already have them. b. To prevent nuclear weapons from being developed by countries that did not already have them.

c. To focus attention on peaceful development of atomic energy c. To focus attention on peaceful development of atomic energy

d. To stop the effects of nuclear fallout from contaminating the planet’s atmosphere  d. To stop the effects of nuclear fallout from contaminating the planet’s atmosphere 

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Shoe fitting fluoroscopes, which showed live X-ray images of a customer’s foot inside a shoewere purported to demonstrate exemplary shoe fitting and were sold in the United States and other countries starting in the 1920s. Their use dropped off precipitously in the second half of the 20 th  century and none were in use by the mid-1970s. What can we infer from this about public views of radiation and atomic science? Shoe fitting fluoroscopes, which showed live X-ray images of a customer’s foot inside a shoewere purported to demonstrate exemplary shoe fitting and were sold in the United States and other countries starting in the 1920s. Their use dropped off precipitously in the second half of the 20 th  century and none were in use by the mid-1970s. What can we infer from this about public views of radiation and atomic science? Shoe fitting fluoroscopes, which showed live X-ray images of a customer’s foot inside a shoewere purported to demonstrate exemplary shoe fitting and were sold in the United States and other countries starting in the 1920s. Their use dropped off precipitously in the second half of the 20 th th  century and none were in use by the mid-1970s. What can we infer from this about public views of radiation and atomic science?

Select one: Select one:

a. From the onset the general public feared and distrusted atomic science and its applications. a. From the onset the general public feared and distrusted atomic science and its applications.

b. While initially quite skeptical of atomic science, the public grew to accept its use. b. While initially quite skeptical of atomic science, the public grew to accept its use.

c. Atomic science was initially seen as exciting and harmless but perceptions later changed  c. Atomic science was initially seen as exciting and harmless but perceptions later changed 

d. Use of atomic science by the general public has been positively from the 1920s until today. d. Use of atomic science by the general public has been positively from the 1920s until today.

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What was the name of the program that researched and built the first atomic weapons in the United States? What was the name of the program that researched and built the first atomic weapons in the United States?

Select one: Select one:

a. Operation Alsos a. Operation Alsos

b. Los Alamos National Laboratory b. Los Alamos National Laboratory

c. Tube Alloys c. Tube Alloys

d. Manhattan Project  d. Manhattan Project 

Question  18 Question  18 Question  Question  18 18

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Radiogenic isotopes used to image different parts of the body are seen as very dangerous and highly experimental uses of nuclear radiation in medicine. Radiogenic isotopes used to image different parts of the body are seen as very dangerous and highly experimental uses of nuclear radiation in medicine.

Select one: Select one:

True True

False  False 

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Albert Einstein was a strong proponent for the development of nuclear weapons before and after World War II. Albert Einstein was a strong proponent for the development of nuclear weapons before and after World War II.

Select one: Select one:

True  True 

False False

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What was the second country to successfully develop nuclear weapons capability following the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945? What was the second country to successfully develop nuclear weapons capability following the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945?

Select one: Select one:

a. Japan a. Japan

b. Soviet Union  b. Soviet Union 

c. United Kingdom c. United Kingdom

d. China d. China

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